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Working with two screens

Have you ever thought about adding a second screen to your computer setup at home? If you’re never able to cram in everything you’d like to see on a single screen, investing in a second one might be the way to go. In this post, John Espirian discusses the value of increasing our screen real estate.

Two screens

Working with two screens can be a great timesaver

Read the rest of this article in my guest post on The Proofreader’s Parlour.

Thanks for reading,

John Espirian

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HTML lists

HTML lists

Most of us know how to create a list in a word processor. In HTML, the process is a little more involved.

There are 2 types of HTML list:

  • Ordered lists – often called numbered lists
  • Unordered lists – often called bulleted lists

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Writing out web addresses

What is the best way to write out web addresses? In an article published on the blog of the Society for Editors and Proofreaders, John Espirian explains how it’s done.

Here’s a question I’ve seen a few times of late: when writing out a web address, must we include the whole address or is it safe to omit part of it?

Some house styles set out guidelines for writing web addresses. One would think, then, that the practice is simply a matter of style. In fact, it mostly is – but not always.

To read the rest of the article, see this SfEP blog post.

Components of a web address

Thanks for reading,

John Espirian

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RGB and HEX colours

You’re probably aware that when it comes to computers, colours are represented by a series of numbers. In this post, John Espirian explains two of the most common colour systems used on the web.


Espirian

RGB and HEX are colour systems used on the web

There are lots of colour systems available, but the two mentioned here use the additive colour system. This means they are based on the combination of light, with the primary colours being red, green and blue. In the additive system, red, green and blue together produce white.

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Enhancing web output with jQuery

In this post, John Espirian explains how a few lines of code can allow us to add a host of rich features to our web output.

(This article first appeared in the Spring 2014 edition of Communicator, the magazine of the Institute of Scientific and Technical Communicators.)

Most technical communicators are used to producing content that makes its way onto the web in some form or other. It is becoming ever more important to grasp the reader’s attention quickly, and one way to do that is by enhancing the formatting and functionality of web output.

Many of us are aware of how unappealing it can be to be presented with dreary blocks of texts, tables of data and such like. We can spruce up the content by taking some basic actions: using clear headings, writing short sentences, including visual aids, and so on.

jQuery

jQuery is a JavaScript framework

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Anatomy of an HTML page – part 5

Anatomy of an HTML page – part 5

In this post:

This series has covered some of the common elements found within the <body></body> element of HTML documents. This time, we’re going to look at the <head></head> element, which contains the essential metadata that helps give our content both meaning and style.

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Anatomy of an HTML page – part 1

Anatomy of an HTML page – part 1

In this post:

With more and more editors being expected to correct content on the web, it’s becoming increasingly useful for us to know at least the basics of HyperText Markup Language (HTML). So, here’s a simple introduction to the language of the web.

Whenever you view a website, your web browser converts HTML code into rendered text, images and other media. If you ever want to fix or amend the contents of a page, you’ll often need to change that HTML code. The very thought of this strikes fear into many hearts, but that needn’t be the case.

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